GGANTIJA TEMPLES

It has been quite a few days since I wrote in my blog, so now I am back and with pleasure. My sister was with us and we had so much to see and talk about that nothing came from writing. It was, of course, a very valuable time.

Gozo is still a place where, now after nearly two months I’m totally happy, relaxed, and feeling joy in everyday walking around the beautiful limestone houses, churches, other buildings and landscapes. The flowers, plants and insects are very attractive to me and to learn about them is a delight. The people are friendly and very nice. I have now attended two of my pillow lace making classes and have become friendly with the women there, delightful, and I just totally adore making the lace – well that is to say – learning the first stitches. It is a very relaxing activity and the work is beautiful to look at.

With December coming up there is a lot of activity planned by the local people to celebrate Christmas, religion is still very much part of it, which is only normal in my view and it is refreshing not to be in a total commercial way of celebrating Christmas. It is warm, feels like it is around 20C and sometimes over 20C. We have had thunder storms and one week of much needed rain, you could see the fields becoming greener as the days went by. Now I see farmers tending to their vegetable plots.

I cannot help taking photos, some of which I hope to use in starting to draw in pencil, and I like to share them too. This place is a photographer’s paradise if you are interested in architecture – which I am too. But also if you just like to document the local flora and fauna. I know that in the coming month I will have the opportunity to photograph people at their festivals and that too will be interesting.

And so I will share our last day together. My sister and I delighted as we visited the ancient temples in Xaghra and walked for two hours around that really charming town. We had a lovely lunch in the square as well. And we descended 10 meters down into the earth to look at caves, it was a strange feeling being in the bowels of the earth, very strange and my first time being in such a low cave, our heads nearly touching the ceilings.

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Man selling little jars of Carob syrup or honey on the way to the  temples.

Views of the Ggantija temples which date back to between 3600 and 3200 B.C.  The outer shell of the temples has been well preserved because it has been made from Coralline limestone which is hardwearing, while the inner structures like doors or altars had been made in the softer Globigerina limestone.

Lunch at a nice little eating place near the church and in the square was delicious.  We walked for hours along the narrow roads of this town, we saw beautiful lacy curtains on the double doors which is traditional here.  I love the arches, the different features in the architecture of the houses, and the use of a little colour is striking as seen in the blue paint on the gold stone.  Often people may be sitting on a bench or chairs and enjoying the peace of the place here in Gozo.  My sister Josefine posing near a beautiful historical door.

Inside the caves.  Though fascinating it is not totally my cup of tea, I was too aware of being so deep underground.

We came across this man making his lace.  My teacher later told me that he is the only ‘man’ in Gozo that makes lace.  His work was so very neat!

And this are the leaves, bark, fruit, and flower of the Carob tree (Ceratonia silique), and evergreen tree the pods of which are used here to make a syrup used for cough and sore throats.  Originally also used as animal fodder, the tree belongs to the pea family.

I hope to be back now to writing as I have so much to share of this amazing place.  All my senses are at top performance to take it all in and reflecting on it is what my blog at the moment is all about.  I hope my friends and followers will enjoy some of it too.

 

15 thoughts on “GGANTIJA TEMPLES

  1. I too have been writing less on my blog recently, although my case is undoubtedly more to do with lack of material to share!

    Anyway, I wish I was in a position to do an extended stay somewhere like Gozo. It reminds me of Greece.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Well, in another eight years the Residence Order will expire, so in theory my daughter (if she wanted) and I could stay for more than 28 days outside the jurisdiction of England and Wales….

        Liked by 1 person

      2. A Residence Order means I have primary parental responsibility, our daughter lives with me and cannot be taken out of the jurisdiction at all by her dad. She herself can leave the country for up to 28 days with me – and I assume someone who I grant the status of loco in parentis (e.g. to go on a school trip).

        I did ask for this order, or more precisely my solicitor recommended it. However, I have since learned that it is normally a legal requirement (in England and Wales) that one parent has the consent of the other or a court order for them to take the child out of the jurisdiction at all (even for a day trip to Scotland). The order in any case affords me an extra protection against abduction and means I can’t deprive her of her father, although sadly he has decided to disregarded the offer made in the court order regarding contact and doesn’t see her at all!

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Hello Gaia, What a well-constructed post. How interesting. The photos are lovely, especially the one in the restaurant. Through the window there’s like a silhouette effect of a couple sitting at a table drinking. A great effect. Was that natural or did you add to photo?
    Regards. Marie

    Liked by 1 person

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