RURAL IRISH ROADS

A look back at a journey taken last September along the roads of West Cork, and the lovely surprise when we came across some forest, some very old trees, lots of beautiful Ferns also lined the road, there was an old gate, and a large ruin, but I am not sure what the history of it was, and now I am not even sure if it was the road between Bandon and Macroom, but I think that it was. It being September, it was autumn still, the road was littered with lovely shades of coloured leaves. It made this journey magical and beautiful.
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17 thoughts on “RURAL IRISH ROADS

  1. The scenery is so beautiful, like something out of a fairytale. If I could describe the magnificence that you have captured in your photographs when I am writing one of my stories, I would have a bestseller for sure. You live in a beautiful country.

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    1. Yes it is so magical here, Ireland is like that, there is a strong feeling here that nature is alive and doing it’s own thing. I once described the branches of the trees at the edge of the national forest an hour away from where I live, as looking like old arthritic women, yes nature is very much alive here, and it does one good to abide in it. Having said that, you can probably see this sort of thing everywhere on earth once you are tuned into it. Have a nice evening!

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  2. Can I live in that run old stone building? I’ll fix it up real nice and pretty. One of the things I miss about living on the east coast is all the old buildings. Not as old as this, but definitely more so than in California. Here, the paint is still wet. Beautiful photos. As usual!

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    1. Thank you James, Ireland is full of ruins, beautiful ruins some of them, sometimes a whole little village of ruins is found, where the people would have all had to leave, perhaps during the 1847 famine, yes and many of them moved to America! This stretch of road was so very beautiful indeed.

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      1. Fascinating! I must visit! My father’s side came over from Alsace Lorraine (and before that Mecklenburg, and before that Gielow Germany) in 1863. My mother’s side was a wee bit earlier. They came over from England. On the Mayflower in fact! My 10th great grandfather was Myles Standish. That was in the 1640’s I believe. I love history, especially when I can put one of my relations into perspective.

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      2. It’s just great when you can place your ancestry so far back in time. You seem to have come from a good mix too. I can only go back to the seventeen hundreds when my mother’s side was partly from Holland, and partly from Denmark or Norway. On my father’s side they were in Belgium and French Flanders (now N.France). And now my daughter is married to an Irish man, so my grandkids are half Irish and half Belgian, and so it goes on……….

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      3. I really got emerged into genealogy after my father passed. I was searching for connections and new discoveries about him once he was gone. A form of therapy for me. Now I’m hooked! Found living relatives that no one in my family knew about. Now, if only I could read German! I’m stuck with German church records and have hit a wall around 1720 for my dad’s side.

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  3. Ireland seems to be a very beautiful country (as I see from your wonderful photos) which I would like to visit some day, Agnes. Hope you are fine. Did you have such a storm, too? Have a nice sunday, regards Mitza

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    1. Yes we had stormy weather here the last few days, and very wet too. There is no going into the garden then, and things have been flying around a bit there too 🙂 I’ll be away several days in the coming week Mitza, going to a wedding in Co Wicklow, great photo opportunities I hope as that is a most beautiful area of Ireland too.

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